14 Replies Latest reply: Jan 29, 2013 2:21 AM by starbuckfrack RSS

Regulation in the gaming industry

iplay2slay

No I don't mean stricter laws on video game ratings or changing the purchasing age of  M rated game.  We need some kind of regulation against games that are released with major defects / flaws & servers that are not up to par for the large COD community.  This is where someone would come in & say "hey, you have a certain ammount of time to fix this before you get fined."   Activsion / Treyarch would learn to figure out these issues fast!  Don't get me wrong I know the devs work hard & I'm not against a company making profit, just don't like seeing & reading about people getting upset over something they spent their hard working dollars over.  This is a game, it's meant for entertainment & most importantly fun. 

I couldn't imagine any gamers out there who would complain about a game that works almost flawlessly upon release...

 

BTW, I am on the Ps3, if you gamers on the X-box think it's bad switch over to my system.  I plan on getting a X-box in the next month, mainly for the kid's with the kinect but I do plan on eventually getting Black ops 2 to see how much of a difference it is & to also finally get the DLC early

  • Re: Regulation in the gaming industry
    iivrruummii

    Every game has glitches.  Every game has flaws.  You could spend 5 years to making a game, and there will still be flaws/glitches.  You can have a beta and still have issues.  A video game is all about what the consumer takes from it.  It could be the worst game in the world and be the funnest at the same time.  It could be the best game in the world and be the most frusterating game at the same time.  If people don't like a game then don't play it, because there are many games on the market and most of them are very good and enjoyable.  If you cannot find another game to play for atleast a month then you should just get rid of your xbox/ps because you are not a true gamer.

  • Re: Regulation in the gaming industry
    Joco3000

    My understanding of the situation is that when a person buys a copy of CoD, the only promised part is the single player and that's it. Online can be taken off at any point without warning if they so wish.

     

    Oh, if I'm having issues with my connection on CoD, I usually play Skyrim, but I can't recommend that for you. PS3 hates ports.

    • Re: Regulation in the gaming industry
      sqitso

      Ugg a post from someone who has absolutely NO IDEA what they are talking about. I have worked for 5 game studios in my time. There IS regulations. The game is purposed to investors, all of which have firms they report to. Those firms set regulations as to what type of product they are investing in. They have to get what they are paying for. Standards are set in place so you can't just take the investor's money and run away with it... or release an absolute piece of garbage and keep the money. Activision, Treyarch and everyone involved don't just do as they please and make whatever they want. They have guidlines they have to meet or the product cannot be released and if it is released without meeting those standards.. THERE ARE fines and other penalties. However, there are also fines for not meeting a release date on a product advertised. If you advertise a release date you have to meet it or the fines and penalties are far worse than release a game with a few bugs. That's why many games are released and immedietly patched.. or continually patched.

      • Re: Regulation in the gaming industry
        Bielsalmighty

        So we have to blame the corporate types, and not the devs? What a twist!

         

        Tbh, I already knew this was the case. Take most any problem in the world today, and theres a man in a suit behind it.

      • Re: Regulation in the gaming industry
        starbuckfrack

        sqitso wrote:

         

        Ugg a post from someone who has absolutely NO IDEA what they are talking about. I have worked for 5 game studios in my time. There IS regulations. The game is purposed to investors, all of which have firms they report to. Those firms set regulations as to what type of product they are investing in. They have to get what they are paying for. Standards are set in place so you can't just take the investor's money and run away with it... or release an absolute piece of garbage and keep the money. Activision, Treyarch and everyone involved don't just do as they please and make whatever they want. They have guidlines they have to meet or the product cannot be released and if it is released without meeting those standards.. THERE ARE fines and other penalties. However, there are also fines for not meeting a release date on a product advertised. If you advertise a release date you have to meet it or the fines and penalties are far worse than release a game with a few bugs. That's why many games are released and immedietly patched.. or continually patched.

        You mean we have no idea about the small print on the back of the box that says you have no rights ?

         

        Microsoft has to pass the game before it goes gold. They passed it and ever since Activision has lived up to the rules.

         

        There were a LOT more worse peices of garbage out there that failed and those companies did not get fines either.

         

        Remember the onlie portion of Homefront that was a major mess ? How about the really bad lag in the new Halo game ?

  • Re: Regulation in the gaming industry
    pilot2969

    Wow, more regulation? Like what? A government entity? I'm sorry, it's a video game this isn't like the 1920's when rat feces was in our food supply requiring the creation of an FDA type entity to regulate the food industry, that was a matter of public health. This is recreation, no one is forcing you to buy these games or play them online. Why is it that whenever people have a freaking problem the first thing they want to do is have the government step in and "fix" it. Instead of doing that, why don't gamers as a whole demand a better product, or better yet, MAKE a better product. That's the beauty of a free market system! A COD killer will eventually be created given enough time and resources. Or the franchise will kill itself by continually producing a poor product. The gaming industry wasn't born out of regulation, it was born out of a free market system.

  • Re: Regulation in the gaming industry

    I've played several games where they used dedicated servers and you could actually tell your skill level against your opponent. If they were fast and accurate, you knew it and the challenge was more fun than frustrating.

     

    COD is not like this. It's hard to tell the difference between lag and skill, and that's why the experience is crap. I only play this game to group up with my friends.

    • Re: Regulation in the gaming industry
      Bielsalmighty

      Forza 4 runs on P2P and runs near flawlessly. Couldn't believe how well it ran when playing transatlantic!

      • Re: Regulation in the gaming industry

        Seems like lag wouldn't really be very noticeable in a racing game.

         

        Like in GTA 4, you wouldn't see the host lag in races, but you would in gun fights. That is a good example of P2P lag. A gunfight is very quick and the smallest difference in lag can be seen, where as a race is just driving a car so it probably only matters at the end of the race if you're neck and neck. I've heard that players that lag in Madden will totally mess up the game since their players will appear to be in the wrong place and you won't be able to tackle them. The objective of the game makes a big difference.

        • Re: Regulation in the gaming industry
          Bielsalmighty

          You get the odd airplane car, but tbh I've never had a Forza equivalent of what I see in CoD, which would be crossing the finish line miliseconds ahead of someone, only to get second place.

           

          That being said, theres usually one player whose car decides halfway through the race that it wants to be an airplane . Or someone who skips around the track (overtaking them, can be....fun....)

           

          As online games try to predict a players actions before they happen, maybe its easier to predict what'll happen in a racer compared to a shooter and thats why we see more hiccups in CoD?

    • Re: Regulation in the gaming industry
      TL_Bare_B_V2

      L4D2 has dedicated servers and they are terrible.

  • Re: Regulation in the gaming industry
    DR65DR

    OP, you need to understand how a game is developed. First of all, most studios have to work to ridiculous deadlines which force the teams to work extremely long days, particularly towards the end of the process, so things will be missed. If you want to point fingers about the end product, then you have to take a long, hard look at the QA and testing teams and just how they went about their business.

     

    And the poster who said he'd worked for five different studios, in what capacity, please? Activision don't present games to 'investors'. They have shareholders to satisfy, but I strongly doubt that a company of Activision's size needs to outsource development funding and pay a rate of return on it rather than self-fund from its vast pile of money and maintain its profit margin.

     

    The fines you talk about are based on target deadlines for build sections of the game and those fines are levied by the publisher against the dev if they fail to meet those targets. It's pretty much the same in most situations where a product or service is sub-contracted (essentially what's happening here). They don't really take into account issues like quality or bugs. Just finished product and how near it is to the proposed ship date.

     

    The bottom line is that all software production in the last decade has become sloppier. If you look at commercial software, it's now bloatware with very little optimisation and it takes up 10 times more space on your drive. Coding is now a sloppy business when it used to be elegant. No reason to believe game coding is any different. How many patches does Microsoft issue for its mainstream software? Apple, Adobe? Everything needs to be patched. Nothing is right when it goes out the door these days.

    • Re: Regulation in the gaming industry
      starbuckfrack

      Nicely worded post.

       

      Especially this Everything needs to be patched. Nothing is right when it goes out the door these days. (SO true like 3ds Max Pro that gets hacked within days of release with the same basic hack.)

       

      Thanks god for the internet. without it we might have maybe 3 or 4 games out there that didnt need a patch . all of the rest would still be in production

  • Re: Regulation in the gaming industry
    starbuckfrack

    iplay2slay wrote:

     

    No I don't mean stricter laws on video game ratings or changing the purchasing age of  M rated game.  We need some kind of regulation against games that are released with major defects / flaws & servers that are not up to par for the large COD community.  This is where someone would come in & say "hey, you have a certain ammount of time to fix this before you get fined."   Activsion / Treyarch would learn to figure out these issues fast!  Don't get me wrong I know the devs work hard & I'm not against a company making profit, just don't like seeing & reading about people getting upset over something they spent their hard working dollars over.  This is a game, it's meant for entertainment & most importantly fun. 

    I couldn't imagine any gamers out there who would complain about a game that works almost flawlessly upon release...

     

    BTW, I am on the Ps3, if you gamers on the X-box think it's bad switch over to my system.  I plan on getting a X-box in the next month, mainly for the kid's with the kinect but I do plan on eventually getting Black ops 2 to see how much of a difference it is & to also finally get the DLC early

    They DO have regulations that they have to follow.

     

    Because you have lag issues , well THAT would not be a problem because a lot of people dont have lag issues.

     

    Overpowered guns , well thats not a game issue it is an opinion. a lot of other things are just opinions like Spawns.

     

    Thing is you bought a DISK with software on it that you dont own. You also bought the online portion AS IS just like it states on the back outside of the box you bought the game on. But you dont own the software nor do you own the service.

     

    They have a complete right to change, add, remove or cancel any of the online portion of this game as well as to drop support at any time without notice. Since you agreed to that when you bought it then you have no leg to stand on.

     

    Trust me you arent the first one to post this kind of stuff on the forums.